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Vacation in Orton Waterville

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Sights in Orton Waterville

Orton Waterville is a village and civil parish in the Peterborough district of Cambridgeshire, England. It is about 10 miles northwest of Peterborough. The parish includes the hamlets of Orton Longueville and Orton Malborne.

The name “Orton” is derived from the Old English for “farm on a hill”. The suffix “ville” was added in the 12th century, after the Norman Conquest, to differentiate it from other places called Orton. The name “Waterville” was first recorded in the 13th century and is thought to represent the Old English for “settlement by the water”.

The village has a history dating back to the AngloSaxon period. It was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as a settlement with a mill and a church. The village grew up around the church and the river. The river was used for milling and for transport of goods.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the village was a thriving market town with a weekly market and three fairs held each year. The market square was the site of the original medieval market cross, which was replaced by a later octagonal structure in 1816.

The coming of the railways in the 19th century brought change to the village. The Midland Railway built a station at nearby Peterborough and the Great Northern Railway built a station at Orton Longueville, on the outskirts of the village. The village expanded to include both stations, but the centre of the village remained around the market square.

The 20th century saw further changes, with the growth of industry in the Peterborough area. The village expanded to the north and east, away from the river. However, the market square and the old parish church remain at the heart of the village.

Orton Waterville is a picturesque village with a strong sense of community. It has a number of historic buildings, including the Grade I listed parish church of St Mary the Virgin, which dates from the 12th century. The market square is a lively meeting place, with a weekly market and a number of shops and pubs. There are also a number of green spaces, including the recreation ground, which is home to the village cricket club.

Just outside the village is Orton Mere, a large lake which is popular for fishing, walking and birdwatching. Orton Waterville is wellconnected, with regular bus services to Peterborough and a train station at Orton Longueville.

History of Orton Waterville

Orton Waterville is a village and civil parish in the Peterborough unitary authority, Cambridgeshire, England. Historically part of Northamptonshire, it lies on the edge of the Orton Longueville district of Peterborough, just south of the city centre.

The village was recorded as “Waterenvilla” in the Domesday Book in 1086. Waterville is derived from Old English and means “farm on or near a watercourse”. The manor was held by Hugh de Grentmesnil and his Overlordship descended to the Earls of Rutland.

By 1220 there was a mill in the village and in 1340 a market cross. The market cross was replaced in 1827 by a stone obelisk on a plinth which now stands in the centre of the village green. In the centre of the village is a stone trough which was presented to the community in 1887 by Captain Meadows Taylor in memory of his father who lived in the village.

Orton Waterville was once a thriving agricultural village with several inns and public houses, a posts office, blacksmith, wheelwrights and a mixture of other shops and businesses. The coming of the A1 dual carriageway in 1958 which bypassed the village reduced the traffic through the village and the consequent loss of trade led to the closure of many of the businesses. The only shops now in the village are a Cooperative Society shop and a hairdresser. There is a village hall and a recreation ground.

The civil parish covers an area of 881acre and includes the village of Orton Waterville and the hamlets of Orton Malborne and Orton Longueville. The 2001 census recorded a parish population of 2,479, increasing to 2,593 at the 2011 Census.

The village church is dedicated to All Saints and has a 13thcentury nave With aisles added in the 14th century. The west tower was built in the 15th century. The east end of the church was rebuilt in 1857. The parish is part of the benefice of Orton with Marham which includes the neighbouring parishes of Fenstanton, Hilton, Norman Cross and Woodston.

There are two public houses in the village: The Boot which dates from the 17th century and The Ploughman which was originally two cottages built in the early 19th century.

Orton Waterville is a village and civil parish in the Peterborough unitary authority, Cambridgeshire, England. Historically part of Northamptonshire, it lies on the edge of the Orton Longueville district of Peterborough, just south of the city centre.

The village was recorded as “Waterenvilla” in the Domesday Book in 1086. Waterville is derived from Old English and means “farm on or near a watercourse”. The manor was held by Hugh de Grentmesnil and his Overlordship descended to the Earls of Rutland.

By 1220 there was a mill in the village and in 1340 a market cross. The market cross was replaced in 1827 by a stone obelisk on a plinth which now stands in the centre of the village green. In the centre of the village is a stone trough which was presented to the community in 1887 by Captain Meadows Taylor in memory of his father who lived in the village.

Orton Waterville was once a thriving agricultural village with several inns and public houses, a posts office, blacksmith, wheelwrights and a mixture of other shops and businesses. The coming of the A1 dual carriageway in 1958 which bypassed the village reduced the traffic through the village and the consequent loss of trade led to the closure of many of the businesses. The only shops now in the village are a Cooperative Society shop and a hairdresser. There is a village hall and a recreation ground.

The civil parish covers an area of 881acre and includes the village of Orton Waterville and the hamlets of Orton Malborne and Orton Longueville. The 2001 census recorded a parish population of 2,479, increasing to 2,593 at the 2011 Census.

The village church is dedicated to All Saints and has a 13thcentury nave With aisles added in the 14th century. The west tower was built in the 15th century. The east end of the church was rebuilt in 1857. The parish is part of the benefice of Orton with Marham which includes the neighbouring parishes of Fenstanton, Hilton, Norman Cross and Woodston.

There are two public houses in the village: The Boot which dates from the 17th century and The Ploughman which

Vacation in Orton Waterville

Orton Waterville is a village and civil parish in the Huntingdonshire district of Cambridgeshire, England. The village is situated approximately 8 miles (13 km) east of Peterborough and 4 miles (6 km) northwest of Werrington. The parish includes the hamlets of Orton Longueville, Orton Malborne and Orton Wistow.

Orton Waterville was first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Watervillare”, meaning “the settlement by the water”. The manor belonged to the Abbey of Peterborough, and after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539 it was bought by Sir Richard Cotton.

The village has a church, Orton Waterville All Saints, which is a Grade II* listed building.

The Orton Hall Hotel, a country house hotel, is located in the village.

Orton Waterville has a post office and a primary school, Orton Waterville CE Academy. Secondary education is provided at the nearby town of Huntingdon.

There are a number of holiday cottages available to rent in and around Orton Waterville. The village is a great base from which to explore the local area, with a number of historic sites, charming towns and villages, and beautiful countryside all within easy reach.

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